State Rundown: Sept. 2


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Oil tax ballot fails in Alaska, film tax credits pass in California, and Ohio needs to do more on EITC expansion. Also: updates on Iowa gubernatorial election and a new report on airline gas tax breaks.

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Everyone Who Calls for Repealing the Corporate Tax Is Wrong


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Every now and then something happens -- a Senate investigation into Apple's tax dodging, Burger King's plan to become Canadian -- that demonstrates that our corporate income tax is very ill. Every time, pundits debate how to cure this disease, offering various tax reform proposals. And every time, a few suggest we shoot the patient, that is, repeal the corporate income tax, which is expected to raise $4.6 trillion over the coming decade.

The idea of repealing the corporate tax seems to have just one virtue, which is that it's simplistic enough to fit into a blog post or op-ed. In every other way this idea is terrible.

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Tax Policy and the Race for the Governor's Mansion: Texas Edition


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Texans will choose a new governor this November. State Attorney General Greg Abbott (R) will face state Senator Wendy Davis (D-Fort Worth). So far, taxes have played a minor role in the campaign, taking a back seat to social issues such as abortion, education funding, and veterans.

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Cumulative Impact of Ohio Tax Changes Revealed


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Since 2004, Ohio lawmakers - from those living in the Governor's mansion to those elected to the legislature - have pushed through numerous changes to the Buckeye state's tax code. Since being elected in 2010, Gov. John Kasich has championed his own series of tax cuts including accelerating already scheduled income tax rate reductions and creating a special new tax break for "pass through" businesses, while providing much smaller tax breaks to low- and middle-income families. Now that Governor Kasich is running for reelection, informed voters ought to be asking, "What's the cumulative impact of these changes?" After all, voters should know the impact of the tax-cut path their elected leaders have led them down.

Thanks to a new report from Policy Matters Ohio (which includes analyses from ITEP) we know the answer. The findings in the report are pretty staggering.

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Will Congress Let Burger King's Shareholders Have It Their Way?


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Burger King's statement that its planned merger with the Canadian donut and coffee chain Tim Hortons is not about avoiding taxes might be one of the biggest whoppers we've heard about corporate inversions.

The merger will allow Burger King to claim for tax purposes that it is owned and controlled by a smaller Canada-based company. We've heard this song before.

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Kinder Morgan Doesn't Want to Be a Limited Partnership Anymore--But They're One of the Few


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Last week the energy giant Kinder Morgan Energy Partners announced that it will restructure itself into a traditional C corporation, moving away from the "master limited partnership" (MLP) structure it helped to popularize almost a quarter century ago. While C corporations pay corporate income tax on their profits, the income of MLP's is passed through to its individual partners and taxed (at least in theory) under personal income tax rules, so these companies can bypass the corporate income tax entirely.

Unlike most partnerships, MLP's are publicly traded. Soon after the first MLP was created in the early 1980s, Congress clamped down on the use of this form: a 1987 law treats most publicly-traded partnerships as corporations for tax purposes. But lobbyists for the extractive industries got an exception for energy companies, including those engaged in exploration, refining and even "fracking." IRS private letter rulings have gradually expanded the scope of the energy-related activities that MLP's can engage in, and as a result the number and value of these tax-exempt entities has grown dramatically

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New CTJ Report: Proposals to Resolve the Crisis of Corporate Inversions


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The ongoing wave of American corporations inverting, or reincorporating as offshore companies to avoid U.S. taxes, has resulted in a bewildering variety of solutions being debated in Washington and in the editorial pages. A new report from Citizens for Tax Justice explains how these proposals differ and which are most effective.

The proposals vary in several ways. Some target inversion by stopping the IRS from recognizing the "foreign" status of a corporation that has not actually moved abroad except on paper, while others target the tax dodging practices that inversion facilitates and which provide its true motivation. Contrary to corporate lobbyists' claims, corporations do not seek to become foreign for tax purposes simply because other countries have lower statutory corporate tax rates. They do it because inversion makes it easier to use accounting tricks to dodge U.S. taxes.

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Tax Policy and the Race for the Governor's Mansion: Pennsylvania Edition


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Voters in 36 states will be choosing governors this November. Over the next several months, the Tax Justice Blog will be highlighting 2014 gubernatorial races where taxes are proving to be a key issue. Today’s post is about the race...

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Tax Policy and the Race for the Governor's Mansion: Maryland Edition


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Voters in 36 states will be choosing governors this November. Over the next several months, the Tax Justice Digest will be highlighting 2014 gubernatorial races where taxes are proving to be a key issue. Today’s post is about the race...

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Congress Wants to Give Businesses a $276 Billion Tax Break That CEOs say Doesn't Spur Investment


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Just when it seems the case for bonus depreciation cannot get any weaker, now business leaders have admitted that it has no effect on investment. A new survey from Bloomberg BNA confirms the CRS's finding that the expiration of bonus depreciation is hardly ruffling a feather among most Fortune 500 corporations. BNA surveyed 100 leaders at large U.S. businesses to find out how, if at all, changes in bonus depreciation and related tax rules are affecting their decisions on capital expenditures, and found that 83 percent of these business leaders believed the expiration of these tax breaks has not affected their capital expenditures in 2014.

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