Labor unions, small business associations and good government groups have lined up to oppose proposals to exempt corporations' offshore profits from U.S. taxes on a permanent basis (by enacting a "territorial" tax system) or temporary basis (by enacting a "repatriation" amnesty). These organizations also oppose any overhaul of the corporate income tax that fails to raise significant revenue.

The organizations spell out their positions on corporate tax reform in a letter sent to members of the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction (commonly called the "Super Committee") today.

Read the letter.

These positions put the organizations at odds with House Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp, who today proposed a corporate tax overhaul that includes a territorial system and that would be "revenue-neutral."

The letter asks the Super Committee to do four things:


1. Reject any proposal to exempt U.S. corporations’ offshore profits from U.S. taxes permanently (by enacting a “territorial” tax system).

2. Reject any proposal to exempt U.S. corporations’ offshore profits from U.S. taxes temporarily (by enacting a “repatriation” amnesty).

3. Require any overhaul of the corporate income tax to raise significant revenue.

4. Require that the revenue-positive result be estimated using traditional revenue scoring procedures as opposed to controversial alternative procedures (often called “dynamic” scoring).

To learn more, see CTJ's fact sheet about raising revenue through corporate tax reform and CTJ's fact sheet about territorial/repatriation proposals.

Photo of Rep. Dave Camp via Michael Jolley Creative Commons Attribution License 2.0

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